Posted on

Blockchain-Based E-Commerce Platform to Help Merchants Open Shops Without Startup Capital

A startup e-commerce ecosystem is turning to blockchain to help businesses become more operationally efficient, while enabling billions of users on social media “to generate income with ease.”

TIPO says it has identified three major problems facing the e-commerce market today. According to the company, many of the platforms currently dominating the industry are too focused on buying and selling when there are many other services that can benefit merchants and their loyal customers. Plus, while online payments have continued to rise, market share is yet to reach its true potential. Lastly, businesses are wasting time and money through “suboptimal logistics and warehousing operations.”

Looking towards the vast user bases enjoyed by the likes of Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat, TIPO argues that most visitors to such platforms haven’t been able to grasp their “limitless” monetization potential – nor have the businesses trying to reach them. As an example of how this platform wants to help everyday social media users make money, TIPO says they would be able to become sales agents for the manufacturers and merchants of products they have purchased and loved. Resultantly, they are paid money for referring their favorite items – be it a hat or a pair of shoes – to friends.

TIPO also hopes to offer advantages to every other stakeholder in e-commerce. While merchants would find it easy to open their very own shop without the need for a large amount of startup capital, the people who buy their products would get the chance to negotiate the best prices, receive tokens for their loyalty, and benefit from blockchain-based tracking methods which are designed to reduce the rates of counterfeit or fake products in the marketplace. In a nod to affiliate marketing, social media users would be paid every time someone clicks on a merchant’s link they have shared. Finally, the businesses shipping the products would also be able to reduce the risk of being given fake orders – and benefit from tools enabling them to “schedule [the] shipping time and route early and efficiently.”

Optimizing payments

According to TIPO’s white paper, e-commerce businesses have been struggling to hit the happy medium between giving users the freedom to make payments online while ensuring that merchants are paid promptly. TIPO aims to remedy this by offering “fast and immediate transactions even during weekends or holidays” and ensuring retailers receive funds as soon as customers successfully complete a transaction. This is going to be achieved through TPO tokens.

The startup is also hoping to help other small e-tailers by reducing their shipping costs and helping the high cost of sales and marketing to tumble substantially.

TIPO acknowledges that its concept can be achieved without blockchain, but argues this technology offers several benefits. For example, buyers and merchants are given the chance to rate each other, and there’s a “guarantee” that payments are processed accurately and on time, with a transaction history that’s immutably recorded. Shoppers can also benefit from healthier discounts and benefits by locking up their TPO tokens.

The future forecast

TIPO is holding an initial coin offering in several stages. A private sale concludes on Sept 20, with a presale taking place from Sept 12 to Oct 9. Finally, the ICO itself will run from Oct 10 to Nov 10.

Development on the TIPO project began in June 2017, with web development starting in August 2017 and Android development in January of this year. Work will commence on an iOS version of the platform in October, paving the way for TIPO to be released in beta come January 2019. By March 2019, it hopes to offer artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning functionality.

Disclaimer. Cointelegraph does not endorse any content or product on this page. While we aim at providing you all important information that we could obtain, readers should do their own research before taking any actions related to the company and carry full responsibility for their decisions, nor this article can be considered as an investment advice.

Posted on

Kim Kardashian West Raises Stakes With Bitcoin in Charity Poker Night Out

Kim Kardashian West, the reality television starlet with 114 million followers on Instagram, staked what appeared to be physical Bitcoin (BTC) chips on a charity poker night out in LA yesterday, July 29.

Kardashian West, sisters Khloé Kardashian and Kendall Jenner, and mom Kris Jenner hosted a table at yesterday’s inaugural “If Only” Texas Hold’em Charity Poker in Los Angeles to raise funds for City of Hope, a nonprofit clinical research and treatment center for cancer.

Amidst her Instagram Stories’ videos of betting with poker chips, the star posted a picture in which she bet with what appeared to be physical Bitcoin chips, accompanied by the jubilant byline “We moved onto bitcoin!”

Poker

The idea of representing Bitcoin with a physical commodity has been around for several years — whether by minting gold coins or bespoke printed banknotes. Kardashian West’s exact choice of a physical Bitcoin is difficult to ascertain from the video, but her endorsement of the cryptocurrency is arguably a significant move given her international cachet.

This May, the Keeping Up With The Kardashians star and beauty brand entrepreneur won the annual CFDA Fashion Awards first Influencer Award, with CFDA board member and designer Tommy Hilfiger saying at the time that:

“Kim is the most important and powerful influencer in the world. Her reach extends far beyond her own brands. Every time she wears, posts or talks about a fashion brand, there is an immediate and significant increase in both awareness and sales.”

As of July 2018, Forbes has estimated Kardashian West’s net worth to be $350 million.

Hip hop artist Kanye West, meanwhile, whom Kardashian married in 2014, revealed his own positive views of Bitcoin in an interview this May. Implying that the cryptocurrency is less fraught with problematic political and national overtones than fiat, he said:

“That was the moment when I wanted to use Bitcoin, when I saw [former slave] Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill. It’s like when you see all the slave movies, it’s like why you gotta keep reminding us about slavery. Why don’t you put Michael Jordan on the $20 bill?”

Before the interview, Kanye had already made waves in the cryptosphere when he laconically but suggestively tweeted “decentralize” this April.

Meanwhile, back in 2014, a smalltime altcoin dubbed Coinye had attempted to capitalize on the artist’s international fame by using his likeness as a mascot. The spoof was swiftly reined in by a trademark infringement lawsuit filed by West’s lawyers.

Posted on

Advertising On Social Media, Explained

Apparently the advertising sector on social media is huge. Is this true?

For ordinary users, social networks are a way to keep in touch with friends. But with 2.5 bln users worldwide, they have now become indispensable marketing tools.

It is estimated that $31 bln was spent on social media advertising worldwide in 2016 – almost doubling over a two-year period.

As newspapers close and TV dwindles in popularity, the likes of Facebook and Twitter are becoming the main destinations for advertisers to spend their cash.

Social media’s share of digital advertising is continually growing – rising from 23.2 percent in 2013 to 34.5 percent in 2017. However, the sector is dominated by search engines, where advertising is tailored to the keywords you type into Google.

Does advertising on social media actually work?

Research suggests that companies who advertise on social media do see public awareness grow – and their brands are often regarded more positively afterwards.

You may have noticed that ads can tend to follow you around – meaning searching for shoes on a retailer’s website suddenly means they’re in your Facebook News Feed.

Advertisers tend to like social media because it’s easier to reach certain people based on their age, gender, location and interests. As you’d imagine, it’s a lot harder to pull off targeted advertising on physical billboards. Not only are they more expensive, but campaigns end up grabbing the attention of the wrong demographics.

Through social media, advertisers can use metrics to see whether their desired audience are engaging with their campaigns. Not all of this is to say the system is perfect, though, as some ad formats are irritating and intrusive – redirecting you away from the website where you wanted to be.

So wait a minute… are they using my data?

Yes – in more ways than you think. Your level of education, ethnicity, whether you own a home, relationship status, birthday, job, political views, car, internet browser, investments and TV habits are just some of the types of data that can be used.

Awareness about how social media companies are using personal information has been heightened by the scandal surrounding Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. The political consulting firm harvested the data of at least 87 mln people after launching an app where hundreds of thousands of people were paid to take a personality test. Participants gave consent for their data to be collected – but the details of their friends were also harvested without their knowledge.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced questions in Congress about the controversy. He denied that the social network sells personal data to advertisers, but said: “What we allow is for advertisers to tell us who they want to reach, and then we do the placement.”

In 2017, the social network generated almost $40 bln in revenue from advertising – a 49 percent increase on the year before.

The drinks are on Facebook, then. Can Blockchain improve advertising?

Several Blockchain platforms are trying to challenge the dominance of big tech firms by giving users control of their data.

In the future, Blockchain could be used to allow you to decide which data you want to be stored about you online – and more importantly, who gets to see it.

If that information ends up being used by advertisers, it could be you who ends up getting a paycheck rather than tech giants such as Facebook and Google.

At the moment, personal data worth billions is being sold per year – but the public doesn’t see a penny of this.

This could have some unexpected, but positive side effects. Advertising could actually prove useful because companies would be working off accurate information. Plus, you could be able to use your own data to personalize apps in an instant.

I’ve heard of social media influencers – what’s their role in all of this?

Social media influencers are people who have a large following online. They might review beauty products on YouTube, post fitness advice on Instagram, or upload funny videos on Facebook.

Some influencers boast millions of fans – and for advertisers, they can be a valuable way of reaching new customers.

Brands are regularly hoping to get their products endorsed by these stars, or to get their items featured in a sponsored post. In some cases, these deals can be worth hundreds of thousands (even millions) of dollars.

There has been controversy over arrangements which have seen influencers speak positively about certain products in posts and videos without disclosing that they have been sponsored to do so. This can prove problematic when it comes to influencers who have a large, impressionable and young fan base.

So how do advertisers get influencers on board?

One common technique is to make sure they are a fan of a product already.

Influencers often talk about how much free stuff they get – and this is in part because brands want to be recognized by them. This method is especially popular when it comes to so-called “micro influencers” – niche talent with a modest following who enjoy high engagement rates.

One challenge can be making sure that an endorsement campaign has a lasting impact on viewers and followers. A single, discreet mention of a product isn’t always going to cut it – and that’s why many campaigns require multiple posts and multiple mentions of a product to succeed.

The cost of this form of social media marketing is often hugely inflated because of the fees taken by agents and social networks.

Can Blockchain make it easier for advertisers and influencers to collaborate?

Certain platforms are hoping to boost the earnings of influencers, while simplifying the steps advertisers need to take to get them on board.

Decentralized platforms such as Patron plan to use smart contracts to make the relationship between customers and creators fairer and more transparent.

Such systems could make it possible for advertisers to pay influencers for a single post, or to hire them exclusively for a period of weeks or months.

Disclaimer. Cointelegraph does not endorse any content or product on this page. While we aim at providing you all important information that we could obtain, readers should do their own research before taking any actions related to the company and carry full responsibility for their decisions, nor this article can be considered as an investment advice.

Posted on

Blockchain Platform Signs Deals To Boost Profitability Of Social Media Influencers

A Blockchain-based platform which aims to boost the earnings of social media influencers by eliminating their reliance on middlemen has forged several new partnerships ahead of its launch.

“Influencers” are defined as contributors who have large followings – sometimes extending into the millions – on social networks such as Instagram, YouTube, Twitter and Facebook.

Patron hopes to become a “sharing economy” where fans and followers can co-star and collaborate with their favorite vloggers.

In addition, companies who want to forge sponsorship deals with influencers would find it easier to get in touch. A business model built on Airbnb means sponsors can hire an influencer for a single post or a video, or establish a recurring “exclusive ambassador contract” which lasts for several weeks or months. In some cases, it would also be possible to acquire influencers in a permanent deal.

At present, Patron claims as much as 40 percent of an influencer’s earnings is paid to intermediaries, but the Japanese company believes stars and their sponsors could realize considerable savings on its platform.

The company has placed an emphasis on “micro influencers” – content creators who often focus on niche topics. Although Patron says such talent often attracts smaller audiences than the megastars seen on video-sharing websites such as YouTube, its team believes they hold exceptional value because of their higher engagement rates.

An “extremely important” partnership

Patron recently announced that it has struck a deal with BANKEX, a fintech company, to become the “first international partner” for one of its services.

MediaToken enables bloggers to promote their accounts and boost their advertising revenue, while investors have an opportunity to invest in an influencer’s account early and enjoy larger dividends later. Overall, BANKEX hopes this Blockchain-based technology will help achieve transparency when it comes to blog advertising – as everyone stands to benefit from “clearer pricing.”

Atsushi Hisatsumi, Patron’s CEO, has called the deal “extremely important” for the company – as BANKEX’s cutting-edge technology will help in its quest “to bring the most robust Blockchain-based influencer marketing products to market.” He told Cointelegraph: “We are excited for this partnership and for what the future holds for us.”

As previously reported by Cointelegraph, Patron’s parent company Extravaganza International recently teamed up with Switchboard Live, an Orlando-based tech firm. As part of that deal, Patron’s users will be able to simultaneously publish live streams on a plethora of platforms including YouTube, Periscope and Facebook Live – dramatically increasing their reach.

The company is also being listed on HitBTC, a European-based cryptocurrency exchange – increasing the visibility of PAT coins.

“Anyone can become an influencer”

Mr Hisatsumi has experience of being in the influencer realm. In the past five years, he worked as a singer and even created a team for electronic dance music.

He believes Patron is democratic because anyone around the world has the opportunity to connect – with local influencers given the freedom to work internationally and overcome language barriers.

Patron’s web app was released in February, and a version for smartphones is scheduled to be released in June.

At the start of April, Patron was the lead sponsor at the Global Blockchain Forum in California – with the start-up achieving critical acclaim from judges. A total of 18 pitches were made to a panel including tech entrepreneur Vince Kohli, with Patron being ranked in the top three.

Patron’s ICO has been running since March 27, and it is scheduled to end on April 26. The company has a cap of $40 mln in place.

Right now, the company’s team of executives are touring the world to spread the word about their project – making appearances at conferences in Dubai, Hong Kong, the US and their native Japan.

 

Disclaimer. Cointelegraph does not endorse any content or product on this page. While we aim at providing you all important information that we could obtain, readers should do their own research before taking any actions related to the company and carry full responsibility for their decisions, nor this article can be considered as an investment advice.

Posted on

Katy Perry Posts Her New ‘Crypto Claws’ On Instagram

Singer and number one Twitter celebrity Katy Perry has joined the crypto craze by posting an image of her crypto-themed manicure on Instagram Thursday, Jan. 25.

Perry’s nails are now decorated with 3D images of five cryptocurrencies superimposed over a background of US dollar bills: the currencies are Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, Stellar and Monero. The singer did not disclose the reasons behind her selection.

The post – captioned “$—CrYpTo ClAwS—$” – has managed to amass over 150,000 likes.

Perry has also tagged the Instagram accounts of all five cryptocurrencies – ethereum_updates, litecoinofficial, bit, stellarlumens and moneroofficial.

More and more celebrities have been exposing their involvement in crypto lately.

Earlier this week, rapper 50 Cent was reported to have made about 700 bitcoins when he started accepting Bitcoin for his album released in 2014. He only remembered about his Bitcoin stash, which now amounts to about $7 mln, this week.

Posted on

Cryptocurrency Evolution Race: Amazon and Instagram – Who Will Take Them First?

The cryptocurrency world is looking more promising than ever. Block-tech is changing the way that traditional ecosystems were working, digital currencies are differentiating the money market, however who will be the first to take the step towards creating applications like Instagram for photo sharing, or an app like Amazon is for e-commerce?

Recently, venture capital investor Chris Dixon and Coinbase co-founder Fred Ehrsam discussed this missing piece of the puzzle on Andreessen Horowitz’s tech podcast “Why Crypto Tokens Matter.”

Dixon and Ehrsam describe the significance of cryptocurrency and its rise through the analogy of how the Web changed information.

The Web allowed for the programmability of information for the first time, cryptocurrencies and tokens allow for the programmability of money or value for the first time.

Thus, through the Internet, new businesses were opened up to the entire globe as information and data was transferred instantly. They feel сryptocurrencies can do the same for money.

The only way to stay at the top of the era-changing wave of technology through adaption, are the only ones that give all-in being the first native app ont he kind.

For example, Amazon success is based on the thought of keeping one foot in a normal bookstore, and the other in brick-and-mortar store likewise.

On the other hand, Instagram brilliantly rode the wave of change which in that particular time was mobile-only apps, making it possible to upload pictures and media only from the phone while Flickr made you go to your computer to do it.

Instagram changed the paradigm however and created a mobile-only photo app that did not even have a webpage – something unheard of at the time.

It is hard to even say what the defining Blockchain business that sparks a revolution will look like. There are more and more ICOs and companies trying to be the genre-defining one, especially with the use of Ethereum and smart contracts, but up until now, nothing is gaining big enough traction to be noticeable.

That is not to say that the Blockchain-only native business has not yet been created; time may be the factors keeping it back.

Read Also:


– For more Cryptocurrency market related Updates and News Follow us on our Facebook and Twitter pages.
Posted on

Who WIll Create Amazon and Instagram of Cryptocurrency?

There is much hype, promise and excitement around the whole cryptocurrency space. Blockchain technology is disrupting traditional ecosystems, cryptocurrencies are evolving the money market – but there is yet to be a pioneering native app.

Investors and crypto believers are starting to ask where this paradigm-changing idea based solely on the power of cryptocurrencies and Blockchain will come from. Who will create what Instagram is for mobile photo sharing, or what Amazon is for native web apps for e-commerce?

Programmability of money

Recently, venture capital investor Chris Dixon and Coinbase co-founder Fred Ehrsam discussed this missing piece of the puzzle on Andreessen Horowitz’s tech podcast “Why Crypto Tokens Matter.”

Dixon and Ehrsam describe the significance of cryptocurrency and its rise through the analogy of how the Web changed information.

The Web allowed for the programmability of information for the first time, cryptocurrencies and tokens allow for the programmability of money or value for the first time.

Thus, through the Internet, new businesses were opened up to the entire globe as information and data was transferred instantly. They feel сryptocurrencies can do the same for money.

Burning the boats

With this new technology now available, the world is yet to see a company that goes all in on it in order to catch the top of the wave of potentially huge success.

There are companies, like Amazon and Instagram, that ‘burnt their boats’ with the traditional ways of doing things and thus profiting hugely from the new technology.

Companies which have the greatest chance to capture the most value with every big wave of technology – such as Web, mobile, and now crypto – are the ones who go all-in on being the first native app for the new wave.

E-Commerce pioneer

Amazon is where it is today because when it started out there was no thought of keeping one foot in the traditional bookstore market – a brick-and-mortar store. Amazon created their native Web app for e-commerce and unlike Barnes & Noble, did not try and keep a stake in actual stores.

Mobile only photos

Similarly, Instagram rode the wave of mobile-only apps, a tech that only arrived 10 years ago. There were mobile apps prior to that, that were modeled on websites, and Flickr was the dominant photo site in the beginning. They created a mobile app for themselves but still was geared to you going to your computer and uploading photos.

Instagram changed the paradigm however and created a mobile-only photo app that did not even have a webpage – something unheard of at the time.

The native Blockchain business?

It is hard to even say what the defining Blockchain business that sparks a revolution will look like. There are more and more ICOs and companies trying to be the genre-defining one, especially with the use of Ethereum and smart contracts, but up until now, nothing is gaining big enough traction to be noticeable.

That is not to say that the Blockchain-only native business has not yet been created; time may be the factors keeping it back.